Pool pumps & repairs


 
 
The following prices (which include labour and parts) could apply to having your pool pump either repaired or replaced depending on what's wrong with it:
 
  • Removal of pump to have repaired in the workshop: 
    R 450,00 call-out to remove pump + R 900,00 to replace both bearings, shaft seal & flange o-ring + R 250,00 to re-install pump = R 1 600,00                              
                OR
  • Install new 0,75Kw Speck pump: R 2 650,00 (comes with 2 year manufacturer's warranty)
                OR
  • Install new 1,1Kw Speck pump: R 2 850,00 (comes with 2 year manufacturer's warranty)
 
The pump repair price mentioned above (R 1 600,00) is the minimum to have the pump repaired assuming that the bearings have seized or are in the process of seizing. If the bearings have seized the motor will not turn/run at all and if the bearings are in the process of seizing the pump usually makes a high pitched whining sound and sometimes a grinding sound. Both of these sounds are clearly audible and discernible. This type of repair is referred to as an "overhaul" and must include the shaft seal and flange o-rings since these will have been worn by the time the bearings have worn.
 
Unfortunately a repaired pump can only get a maximum 3 month workmanship guarantee. Typically it's only the bearings that will have worn or seized but often there are other worn or damaged internal mechanical parts such as the impeller and the diffuser, and then there's always the possibility that the flange or drive end shield are damaged. If either of these parts need replacing along with the bearings the repair costs will increase by between R 200,00 (for just the impeller) - R 450,00 (impeller & diffuser)
 
There is of course a chance that the pump itself is being obstructed or even blocked in which case something is either wedged between the impeller and the diffuser (obstruction) or leaves, grass, etc. could be blocking the veins of the impeller. In the case of an object being wedged in between the diffuser and the impeller it can be removed and the pump should run smoothly unless some internal damage occurred and in the case of a simple blockage the veins can easily be unblocked by a professional and the pump typically runs smoothly again.
 
Unblocking a pump or removing an obstruction will result in the following minimum costs being applied:
 
  •  R 450,00 call-out + R 250,00 labour = R 700,00 (but if there's internal damage the minimum R 1 600,00 repair price [highlighted in yellowand the cost of the replaced part [highlighted in orange] will apply instead of the R 700,00 since the pump will have to be removed and repaired in a workshop)
 
If the pump doesn't want to run but it makes an electrical "humming" sound this is typically the capacitor that has blown and this would cost the following:
 
  •  R 450,00 call-out + R 150,00 (for the part) = R 600,00
 
If you'd like to try to establish what's more than likely wrong with the pump to try to get a better idea of what the related costs might be you could follow these simple steps:
 
1. Switch the mains off in the pool electrical DB box
2. Open the pump lid
3. Remove the basket
4. Put your hand inside the cavity towards the bottom and towards the electric motor side of the pump
5. Feel for the impeller and make sure it can turn or rotate
 
This test is simple and safe provided you turn off the main switch in the pool DB box or even better, the switch feeding the pool DB from inside the house at the main DB in the house. If there is no movement inside the pump cavity in terms of the impeller moving, etc. then you ca safely assume that a costly repair could be due but if you're lucky it could just be obstructed or blocked in which case you would have felt leaves or grass or even a piece of plastic of some sort in the impeller area. If the impeller turns when you have your hand inside the pump then typically there would be an electrical hum associated with having tried switching the pump on (BEFORE you stuck your hand in the pump and BEFORE you switched off at the mains) in which case it could just need a new capacitor.
 


Back to top